Material Scientists of TU Freiberg Collaborate with CERN

Profile of a superconducting wire.
The Institute of Materials Science at the TU Bergakademie Freiberg, under the supervision of Professor Andreas Leineweber, has started a collaborative research project related with the Future Circular Collider (FCC) Study at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) in Geneva/Switzerland

This programme lays the foundations for a successor to the LHC (Large Hadron Collider), currently the largest particle accelerator in the world, with which the Higgs boson was discovered at CERN in 2012.

The Higgs boson is an elementary particle in the Standard Model of particle physics. In 2013, the physicists Peter Higgs was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his theoretical predictions

Future accelerators, which will provide even deeper insight into the structure of matter, require new superconducting magnets producing almost double the magnetic field of those in the LHC: a level of performance that cannot be achieved with current state-of-the-art superconducting wires. A meeting with participants from industry and research institutions dedicated to the development of suitable superconducting wires took place in March 2018 in Geneva. Further collaboration partners are the TU Vienna and universities in Geneva and Genoa. 

Group Picture The most promising material for the superconducting wires to be developed is Nb3Sn, a brittle intermetallic phase, which is generated by a complex heat treatment process applied to coils wound from a precursor wire. The Institute of Materials Science will receive funding from CERN for the next 2½ years to perform research on the interdiffusion and reaction processes occurring during the formation of Nb3Sn. This research will obtain new insights into these processes, which decisively affect the performance of Nb3Sn superconducting wires, providing valuable support for the design and optimisation of wires meeting the requirements of the FCC.

Further information: https://cerncourier.com/faces-and-places-137

Contact: Prof. Andreas Leineweber, Tel +49 3731 /39-2622